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Energy and Arkansas

Energy Efficiency

Energy efficiency refers to programs that are aimed at reducing the energy used by specific end-use devices and systems, typically without affecting the services provided. Energy efficiency becomes more important as energy prices increase and Arkansas population centers change. Energy efficiency may be able to reduce Arkansas’ overall energy consumption while still producing the same level of end-use services. Examples may include efficient lighting programs, high-efficiency heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems and controls, high efficiency appliances, efficient building design, fuel-efficient engines, advanced electric motor drives and heat recovery systems.

The commission members may study these and other solutions and their short- and long-term impacts for Arkansas.

Homeowners use energy efficiency to save energy and money. For more information on energy efficiency for homes, visit the Arkansas Energy OfficeEnergy Efficiency Arkansas and Department of Energy.

Builders

New home construction presents an opportunity to incorporate energy-saving features right from the start. For more information for builders, visit the Arkansas Energy Office and Department of Energy.

Commercial

Commercial buildings present a substantial opportunity for energy conservation and energy efficiency. For more information on energy management in commercial buildings, visit the Arkansas Energy Office and Department of Energy.

Industry

Industrial facilities can use energy management tools and resources to manage and reduce load demand. For more information on energy efficiency in commercial buildings, visit the Arkansas Energy Office, Arkansas Industrial Energy Clearing House and National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

Government

Public buildings are often prime opportunities for reducing energy use while saving taxpayer dollars. For more information on energy use in public buildings, visit the Arkansas Energy Office.

Transportation

Transportation consumes a substantial portion of total energy used in Arkansas. For more information on energy use in transportation, visit the Arkansas Energy OfficeAlternative Fuels & Advanced Vehicles Data Center and Department of Energy Vehicle Technologies Program.

Renewable Energy

Arkansas relies heavily on nonrenewable fossil fuels such as coal and natural gas for our energy. Fossil fuels are a finite resource that may eventually dwindle, become too expensive or too environmentally damaging to retrieve and use to meet the state’s energy needs. Renewable fuel sources such as solar, wind, hydro and biomass may not be readily available, economical or environmentally benign in Arkansas either.

The commission may study these and other alternative energy sources and their short- and long-term impacts for Arkansas.

Biopower

Biopower, or biomass power, is the use of biomass to generate electricity. Biopower system technologies include direct-firing, cofiring, gasification, pyrolysis, and anaerobic digestion. For more information on biopower, visit the Arkansas Energy Office and SunGrant BioWeb.

Biofuels

Biofuels includes biodiesel, ethanol, biobutanol, methanol, P-Series, and other fuels from biological feedstocks. For more information on biofuels, visit the Arkansas Energy Office, the SunGrant BioWeb and Alternative Fuels & Advanced Vehicles Data Center.

Solar

A variety of technologies convert sunlight to usable energy for homes and businesses including solar water heating, passive solar design for space heating and cooling, and solar photovoltaics for electricity. For more information on solar energy in Arkansas, visit the Arkansas Energy Office and National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL).

Wind

Wind turbines convert kinetic energy from the wind into mechanical power or electricity. For more information on wind energy, visit the Arkansas Energy OfficeNational Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and U.S. Department of Energy Wind & Water Power Program.

Hydro

Hydro turbines convert the kinetic energy of flowing water into electricity or mechanical power, which is then fed into the electrical grid or sometimes used to power equipment directly. For more information on hydro energy in Arkansas, visit the U.S. Department of Energy Wind & Water Power Program.

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Alternative Energy Commission
c/o Carol Stapleton
One Capitol Mall, 5th Floor
Little Rock, Arkansas 72201
Phone: 501.682.1937 | Fax: 501.682.3072

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